What sewing techniques do you avoid learning?

The January 2012 Threads “Designer Spotlight” (page 22) interviewed Kenneth King and this is what he had to say when asked what advice would he pass along to others interested in couture sewing:

Persistence, practice, persistence, practice.  When you get a technique “in the hands’ as my teacher Simmin Sethna would say, its quicker than using a shortcut.  A shortcut may seem faster, but in the end, doing something correctly from the beginning can save far more time.”

Though I am a big fan of shortcuts myself and love to sew using RTW methods,  Mr. King’s point is well taken. In both persistence and practice I have been remiss when a technique does not come easily. I would love to master the tailoring details that go into a pair of classic tailored trousers.  However making great slacks means welt pockets and perfect fly fronts.  I know that I should just grab some scraps and start practicing but something in me pushes back.  My sewing time is so limited that to “waste” time practicing means I will have to forego some finished garments in designs that sew more quickly.

At least that is what my impulsive mind tells me.  But Kenneth King is asserting that if I would just practice with persistence it would cut my work time in the end.  Something to think about.  It almost makes me want to pull out one of my sewing references and cut some welt pockets.

What sewing techniques do you feel you should learn but find yourself avoiding to do so for some reason?

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9 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. angie.a
    Mar 23, 2012 @ 18:30:36

    Tailoring. I hate hand sewing (hate is a strong word, haha!) and unfortunately an eye issue 2 years ago precludes me from doing a lot of handwork now (or ever actually). It’s too difficult. Plus…I hate fiddly bits. Tailoring is so fiddly!

    Reply

    • Sewista Fashionista
      Mar 24, 2012 @ 14:13:43

      Yes, on tailoring, I feel like I follow the instructions but my piece doesn’t look like the one in the book. Maybe this is best learnt in a class situation.

      Reply

  2. Calico Stretch
    Mar 23, 2012 @ 19:36:21

    I am so much at the beginning of my learning curve that I don’t avoid techniques, I just haven’t had a chance to try them yet. Then again every time I do a project I do at least one new technique. I have a list of things to sew and am working my way through the first one now – gotta do muslins so I guess that’s lots of practice hey?

    Reply

  3. Elaray
    Mar 24, 2012 @ 08:22:52

    I don’t know if this qualifies as a technique, but I’m afraid of outerwear. I’d love to make a winter coat – just the way I want it. If I had to choose a specific technique, it would have to be bound buttonholes. In over 40 years of sewing, I’ve never made a bound buttohole. Maybe I could put them in the winter coat I haven’t made yet! ;-)

    Reply

    • Sewista Fashionista
      Mar 24, 2012 @ 14:17:21

      Oooh, a custom winter coat would be lovely! If you have avoided bound buttonholes for forty years you could just avoid them forty more and put in machine stitched buttohholes like the manufacturers do. That way you could have your cake and eat it too. ;)

      Reply

  4. Sister
    Mar 24, 2012 @ 22:51:57

    Hmm, sleeve plackets. I didn’t finish my collared shirt last year, and I’m dreading trying it again this year because the sleeve placket (and collar stand, for that matter) look very tedious. Also sewing elastic into a swimsuit or underwear….

    Reply

    • Sewista Fashionista
      Mar 26, 2012 @ 10:25:11

      Sleeve plackets are such a pain since the pieces are so tiny. Often I cheat and stick the placket in the sleeve seam but I know that isn’t the tailored thing to do.

      Reply

  5. Denise
    Apr 12, 2012 @ 11:54:45

    I’ve passed the Versatile Blogger Award on to you because I so enjoy your blog. Of course, there are rules. You’ll find them here:

    http://versatilebloggeraward.wordpress.com/vba-rules/

    Thanks so much for sharing your sewing experiences.

    Best,
    Denise

    Reply

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